Brian Eno - Another Green World

Album cover

  1. Sky Saw (3:24)
  2. Over Fire Island (1:51)
  3. St. Elmo's Fire (2:58)
  4. In Dark Trees (2:37)
  5. The Big Ship (2:59)
  6. I'll Come Running (3:50)
  7. Another Green World (1:35)
  8. Sombre Reptiles (2:23)
  9. Little Fishes (1:30)
  10. Golden Hours (4:06)
  11. Becalmed (3:51)
  12. Zawinul Lava (2:59)
  13. Everything Merges with the Night (3:59)
  14. Spirits Drifting (2:52)

Virgin, 1975

Brian Eno's third solo album is a step up from his previous eccentric-rock efforts, interesting and colourful without always feeling the need to be theatrically witty. A series of instrumental vignettes are mingled with the occasional song, all with a varied and imaginative production.

The most memorable song is "St Elmo's Fire", whose catchy tune and clockwork rhythms are decorated by Robert Fripp's manically slithering guitar. There are a couple of others in his familiar breezily quirky style, including "I'll Come Running" and the sinister "Golden Hours" in which he dirgily intones "perhaps my brains are old and scrambled", over a mechanically chugging background. The first two tracks are perky instrumentals featuring a chattering fretless bass. Later on we have a couple of effective zoological sound paintings, "Sombre Reptiles" which sound as if they are lurking in a dusty Australian desert, followed by "Little Fishes" which wiggle and glitter astoundingly accurately.

I was introduced to the album through the brief atmospheric piece "Another Green World", which was used as the theme music from BBC documentary series "Arena" in the 1980s. If I remember correctly, it was accompanied by a highly suitable graphic sequence featuring concentric ripples in dark pool of water. The music itself is very simple, just a long fade in and out of a constantly repeating bassline and a lyrical five-note theme, but this just works.

April 25, 2004

8 out of 10

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